Wellness Journal Supporting Children with a Chronic Illness: Spotlight and Giveaway

Living with a chronic illness is life-altering. When children are diagnosed with an illness they need additional supportive tools. Child life specialists play an important role in providing medical education, creative outlets, and coping skills. Often times, they use books with a similar theme that a child can relate to.

I’m excited to introduce a new addition to the children’s book Tiger Livy. The co-author, Erin Garcia has created a wellness journal that can be used with or without the children’s book. Learn more below and be sure to enter the giveaway.

Guest Blogger, Erin Garcia Co-Author of Tiger Livy

The Tiger Livy Wellness Journal will motivate anyone, regardless of their life circumstances. This journal is connected to the children’s book Tiger Livy, the story of a young girl who unexpectedly gets very sick. Her journey towards health inspires empathy, patience, and grit in its readers.

Even if you haven’t read Tiger Livy, this journal is the perfect way to get to know yourself a little bit better. Journalers gain perspective by naming feelings, observations, and concerns, and recalling important life events. Each week’s entry has a place to track gratitude, important events, feelings, and reflect on the prior week.

Establishing this healthy habit even 10-15 minutes a week impacts your overall health and happiness in a significant way. You can also color in the coloring pages if you enjoy tapping into your creative side. Also added are some extra note pages, in case you need a bit of extra room for those busy weeks. At the end of your weekly entries, there is an awesome year in review page to remind you of how much you’ve grown.

Your weekly journal entries will encourage you in challenging times, motivate you to savor happy moments, promote gratitude and overall wellness, and remind you of all the brilliance you possess. We hope you start your Tiger Livy Wellness Journal today and reap all the benefits it has to offer.

Currently, the journal is available on Etsy, and in a few weeks, will be available on Amazon too.

We will be giving away a copy of Tiger Livy Welness Journal to one lucky winner.

Choose one or more ways to enter:

  1. Sign up for email notifications at ChildLifeMommy.com and leave a comment below.
  2. Facebook: Follow Child Life Mommy and tag a friend.
  3. Facebook: Follow Tiger Livy Project.
  4. Instagram: Follow @ChildLifeMommy and @TigerLivyProject tag two friends in the post.
  5. Twitter: Follow, Like, and RT the post to @ChildLifeMommy.

Good luck, the winner will be chosen by 12/2/20.

Related Articles

Supporting Children with a Chronic Illness: Tiger Livy 

Bringing Play to Chronically Ill Children During a Pandemic

Using Art to Support Children Coping with Illness

Using Art to Support Children Coping with Illness

Guest Blogger, Caroline Robins at Kids & Art

Kids & Art Foundation is a nonprofit organization that provides art experiences for families touched by pediatric cancer and other life-threatening illnesses, to heal, empower, encourage, and create memorable experiences.

Due to COVID, our weekly hospital programs at UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital and Stanford Children’s Hospital were put on hold in March 2020 as were our monthly destination workshops at creative venues. We took our 10 years of experience and our creative resources to be there for our families when they needed us most by creating virtual art workshops as well as amazing art lessons on youtube, to continue healing through the arts. Life was challenging enough for immunocompromised children before COVID. It is even more important to give them access to our workshops now so they can engage, connect, and create with others.

Check out our video about our COVID Response

As our Kids & Art researcher Dawn Linhardt has shared, research has shown that supportive services and therapies such as Kids & Art have been shown to affect stress as demonstrated through decreases in cortisol levels. These interventions are low cost and based on the research have the potential to decrease rates of readmission due to secondary infections.

Stress-relieving interventions such as art are becoming the standard in cancer care within integrative medicine. Preliminary evaluation of data from a study that includes Kids & Art families indicates that the physical symptoms and isolation associated with cancer treatment has a negative effect on the quality of life. We believe that supporting services like ours have the potential to alleviate stress and address the issues of isolation and ultimately improve the quality of life measurements.

Kids & Art is staying true to our mission to always be there for families wherever they are in their treatment. We are delighted to welcome patient families from other states including Alaska, Maryland, Michigan, and Florida as well as our home state of California. Visit our website for more details and a link to register.

What do our workshops include? Along with guided art projects we also include virtual tours of artists’ studios and galleries and invited guest artists. The workshops provide a space for creativity, fun, and stress relief and they bring a sense of togetherness for all ages in a supportive environment.

We have also started a larger Conversation in Improving the Quality of Care by inviting experts from the Art + Health + Innovation space. We have made all these conversations available for free on our YouTube playlist.

Be sure to follow us on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and YouTube.

Related Articles

Bringing Play to Chronically Ill Children During a Pandemic 

Supporting Children and Teens During COVID-19

Tips to Support a Child Receiving Stitches

The first set of stitches is in the books for my little guy, Blake.  After I tossed him in a pond our giant lab, Tank leaped right on top of him. His paw hit Blake’s face and punctured his lip. Both of my kids freaked out. I mean full on tears and a hard time breathing. Blake went limp like a ragdoll, puked before we got him in the car, and then fell asleep from exhaustion. He was at a level 10 for anxiety. We had a 2-hour drive to urgent care, so it gave us time to regroup and calm down.

Here is what we did to make the situation go from high anxiety with pain and trauma to a successful procedure.
  1. I stayed calm. I lowered my voice, made good eye contact, and reminded him that this was my job.
  2. I prepared him for what he would experience. I gave him lots of details and cleared up misconceptions.
    I talked about his job of keeping his body still and breathing. I explained that stitches are string bandaids and that the doctor will numb the area so that he wouldn’t feel it.
  3. I validated his emotions and provided reassurance. “You are so scared right now. I will be there to help you.”
  4. Advocacy. This was a big one for me. I advocated for topical numbing cream which the doctor was hesitant on but then agreed. I knew it would decrease the pain from the lidocaine injection.
  5. Comfort hold. There was a papoose board in the trauma room and B asked what it was. Every meme that The iPad Lady has posted went through my head. There was no way they were going to use that. He was able to lay directly on my chest in a position for comfort.
  6. Distraction. I held up my phone so B could watch a movie during the procedure.
  7. Choices. I gave him as many choices as I could.
  8.  ONE VOICE. When he was getting the stitches it was just the doctor and us, no other team members. Everyone was super calm, the doctor would talk to him about what he was doing before he did it.
  9.  Procedural Support. I named things that he was doing great on, slow deep breaths & keeping his body still.
  10.  Bravery Reward. Yes, he got ice cream and chose a small toy for being so brave.

Highlights: The doctor said,” Good idea Mom on the numbing cream.” ❤️

You can continue to help kids process their experiences and feel empowerment when you ask them to share their stories. It could be done through medical play, art, journaling, or verbaling telling you.

 

Related Articles:

Medical Play 

5 Tips to Help Your Child at The Doctor 

How to Pack an Emergency Go Bag