Support for Families Going Through Divorce During a Pandemic

Guest Blogger, Brooke Chaplan

The current COVID-19 pandemic has affected many aspects of daily living around the world. In the U.S., families are dealing with conflict and tensions as they struggle to adjust to the new normal impacting jobs, healthcare, and education. For many couples, deep-rooted issues are surfacing, causing them to reevaluate their relationship. Some are choosing to divorce, and their families need professional support during this difficult time. Here are some options that could help.

Legal Assistance

Couples who are ready to end their marriage will need to deal with several issues, including their home, children, income, bills, and possessions among other things. Many spouses need the objective guidance of a family law attorney to help them sort out their differences and find a reasonable resolution. A legal separation lawyer can provide objective guidelines for dividing the household and dissolving marital bonds while respecting the needs of both spouses.

Family Counseling

Couples and their children, if any, may benefit from participating in family counseling either individually or as a group. This can help each member come to terms with the divorce and the beginning of a new life that will change relationships and possibly locations. A family counselor can work with each person and the family as a whole to heal emotional wounds and support new life goals and directions. Concerns about family pets, school, community activities, and other questions can be addressed with the assistance of a licensed counselor.

Personal Therapy

If one or more members of the family are dealing with issues like substance abuse, financial insolvency, or problem behavior, individual therapy may be helpful in supporting that person in coming to terms with aspects of his or her actions or interactions that will facilitate recovery and improvement. While the divorce will likely proceed, family members’ problems can be addressed for a healthier and successful future.

Spiritual Support

Membership in a church, synagogue, mosque, or another congregation of religious worship can be very comforting during times of extreme change and potential loss. Family members who do not attend worship services may want to visit a local congregation to explore spiritual beliefs that can help to support them in going through a relationship breakup and family reorganization. Some people prefer yoga or meditation, while others find peace and solace in nature.

These professional organizations can become pillars of support during a family breakup. While divorce is never easy, it may become more bearable with the help of entities like the above.

Author Bio

Brooke Chaplan is a freelance writer and blogger. She lives and works out of her home in Los Lunas, New Mexico. She loves the outdoors and spends most of her time hiking, biking, and gardening. For more information, contact Brooke via Facebook at facebook.com/brooke.chaplan or Twitter @BrookeChaplan

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Virtual Respite Session During COVID-19 For LGBTQ Parents and Caregivers

The pandemic has added a tremendous amount of stress on parents. They are navigating a new normal while supporting their children, and now preparing for drastic changes with a new school year. It’s overwhelming.

I have teamed up with Our Family Coalition a Bay Area LGBTQ community organization to facilitate a free virtual therapeutic respite session for parents. Join us in a self-reflecting art activity while learning coping skills.

When: Wednesday, August 5, 2020, from 8-9:30 pm

Materials Needed: Paper and coloring supplies

Click Here to Register 

If your organization is interested in having a workshop led, please email Shani at Childlifemommy@gmail.com.

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Helping Your Children Return to School After Coronavirus Closures

Guest Blogger, Jenna Sherman of Parent-Leaders

None of us were prepared for the coronavirus pandemic and the resulting lockdown, and it’s hard to tell what effect this whole ordeal has had on our children. Now, as schools make plans to reopen, kids and parents have to navigate a whole new set of challenges. Will your children be able to pick up where they left off? Do they need help getting up to speed on their studies? Can you protect your family from COVID-19 when your kids return to their crowded classrooms? Here are some great resources to answer your questions and prepare your kids for a smooth back-to-school transition.

Smoothing the Transition

Your kids may be excited to go back to school, but they may also feel a little overwhelmed by the abrupt change.

  • Encourage your kids to talk about their concerns.
  • Have your children start going to bed earlier a week or two before school starts again.
  • Plan school lunches and weeknight meals ahead of time to reduce household stress.
  • Your child may benefit from the support of a Certified Child Life Specialist.
Learning at Home

Help your children get back on track with their studies by supporting learning at home.

  • Make sure your kids have a calm and quiet place to study at home.
  • Look for teachable moments throughout your daily life.
  • Research at-home educational resources online.
  • Find ways to apply what your kids are learning in school to real-world situations.
  • If you have younger kids, read with them every night.
Avoiding COVID-19

While schools are reopening with special plans in place to protect students and educators, don’t hesitate to take your own COVID-19 precautions. 

  • Send your kids to school with effective hand sanitizer.
  • Make handwashing a fun activity for your kids.
  • Encourage your kids to choose outdoor play when possible.
  • Deep clean and disinfect the surfaces in your home frequently.

It’s okay if your children are worried or anxious about returning to school after such a long and unexpected break. The transition back to school may be easier for some kids than others. Do what you can to help your kids adjust, and they’ll be back in the swing of things soon enough—kids are amazingly adaptable!

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