Helping My Kids Cope with a Learning Difference

I was honored to be featured as a podcast guest with Child Life on Call. This is my second appearance and the focus was on supporting my children through their learning differences of ADHD, dyslexia, dysgraphia, and coping with anxiety.

Like many, parenting through the pandemic and adapting to distance learning wasn’t easy. My youngest, Blake struggles with dyslexia and dysgraphia. He was doing really well in school and with outside support prior to the lockdown. As soon as he had to go online to finish his second-grade year, his confidence went down the tubes.

I also witnessed my oldest, Gavin who has dyslexia, dysgraphia, ADHD, and struggles with anxiety become overwhelmed with his middle school curriculum online.

As a parent, I have had to learn to navigate the special education road. Learning terms like Individual Educational Plan (IEP),  baseline assessments, and understanding my children’s legal educational rights. 

Take a listen to our story and share it with others who are coping with learning differences.

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4 Activities for Moms and Kids That Lighten the Mood During the Pandemic

Guest Blogger, Rachelle Wilber

This has been a tough year for all sorts of people, and your family is likely feeling the strain. With normal activities canceled and the pandemic bringing a constant sense of unease, you might be finding it hard to lighten the mood. This is especially problematic if you have young children. Despite all the madness swirling in the adult world around them, kids are simply trying to enjoy their childhoods. You can do them a big favor by finding fun activities to cheer them up and bring some sunshine into their lives. While countless outings could do the trick, these four activities are particularly worth considering.

Have a Picnic

Even in the winter, you can bundle up and enjoy the pleasures of eating a meal in the great outdoors. This is a perfect pandemic activity because you can do it away from other people. It’s a big world out there, and you’re sure to find some patch of grass where you can stay properly socially distanced. Bring the kids’ favorite toys, and your lunch could turn into a memorable afternoon.

Visit a Pharmacy

When typical attractions are closed, it’s on parents like you to find unique sources of entertainment. Pharmacies are about much more than pills and medications. Between bulk packages of candy, holiday-themed decorations, and an assortment of toys, there’s plenty in your average pharmacy that will get kids excited.

Go for a Hike

Hiking is an especially great activity because it is both fun and active. Your kids probably have lots of pent up energy from spending so much time cooped up indoors, and they’ll enjoy being able to blow off some steam out on the trail. They’ll also benefit from substituting a bit of fresh air and nature for their typical pandemic-era screen time.

Have a Scavenger Hunt

Scavenger hunts are almost as much fun for a parent to prepare as they are for kids to carry out. All you need for this activity is an outdoor space (a park will work if you don’t have a yard) and a handful of household items. You’ll get a kick out of hiding your belongings, and the kids will get a real thrill from the hunt.

With a bit of creativity, you can still have plenty of family fun during the pandemic. These activities are proven hits among kids and adults alike.

Author Bio

Rachelle Wilber is a freelance writer living in the San Diego, California area. She graduated from San Diego State University with her Bachelor’s Degree in Journalism and Media Studies. She tries to find an interest in all topics and themes, which prompts her writing. When she isn’t on her porch writing in the sun, you can find her shopping, at the beach, or at the gym. Follow her on Twitter and Facebook.

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Support for Families Going Through Divorce During a Pandemic

Guest Blogger, Brooke Chaplan

The current COVID-19 pandemic has affected many aspects of daily living around the world. In the U.S., families are dealing with conflict and tensions as they struggle to adjust to the new normal impacting jobs, healthcare, and education. For many couples, deep-rooted issues are surfacing, causing them to reevaluate their relationship. Some are choosing to divorce, and their families need professional support during this difficult time. Here are some options that could help.

Legal Assistance

Couples who are ready to end their marriage will need to deal with several issues, including their home, children, income, bills, and possessions among other things. Many spouses need the objective guidance of a family law attorney to help them sort out their differences and find a reasonable resolution. A legal separation lawyer can provide objective guidelines for dividing the household and dissolving marital bonds while respecting the needs of both spouses.

Family Counseling

Couples and their children, if any, may benefit from participating in family counseling either individually or as a group. This can help each member come to terms with the divorce and the beginning of a new life that will change relationships and possibly locations. A family counselor can work with each person and the family as a whole to heal emotional wounds and support new life goals and directions. Concerns about family pets, school, community activities, and other questions can be addressed with the assistance of a licensed counselor.

Personal Therapy

If one or more members of the family are dealing with issues like substance abuse, financial insolvency, or problem behavior, individual therapy may be helpful in supporting that person in coming to terms with aspects of his or her actions or interactions that will facilitate recovery and improvement. While the divorce will likely proceed, family members’ problems can be addressed for a healthier and successful future.

Spiritual Support

Membership in a church, synagogue, mosque, or another congregation of religious worship can be very comforting during times of extreme change and potential loss. Family members who do not attend worship services may want to visit a local congregation to explore spiritual beliefs that can help to support them in going through a relationship breakup and family reorganization. Some people prefer yoga or meditation, while others find peace and solace in nature.

These professional organizations can become pillars of support during a family breakup. While divorce is never easy, it may become more bearable with the help of entities like the above.

Author Bio

Brooke Chaplan is a freelance writer and blogger. She lives and works out of her home in Los Lunas, New Mexico. She loves the outdoors and spends most of her time hiking, biking, and gardening. For more information, contact Brooke via Facebook at facebook.com/brooke.chaplan or Twitter @BrookeChaplan

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