“Where are you Lydie?” Spotlight and Giveaway

Grief and loss is a journey that many families face, but how do we support young children with a sibling loss? As a child life specialist, I’m always incorporating books, play, and creative arts to help kids process their loss and find outlets for expression. The loss of a sibling through miscarriage, stillbirth, or even as a child can be difficult to understand.

I’m delighted to share a beautiful story written by a bereaved mother, Emma Poore in the honor of her daughter, Lydie.

Images copyright Emma Poore
Guest Blogger, Emma Poore

“Where are you Lydie?” is a special picture book, sensitively written and illustrated for children between 3 and 7 years old. It is a facilitative story and guide for young children and their parents to explore death and bereavement together and to start those difficult conversations or explore the questions that may come up after the death of a baby in a safe and inspiring space. Grandparents, Teachers, Caring Support Professionals, and friends can also share the story as a platform for exploration too.

 SANDS – stillbirth and neonatal death charity in the UK has endorsed this “Where are you Lydie?”

Images copyright Emma Poore
Where to Purchase

You can purchase “Where are you Lydie?” directly from Emma’s website.

Testimonials

“Warm and beautifully illustrated picture book for children about sibling loss and bereavement to support families through the grief of baby loss.” Child Bereavement UK

“A beautifully illustrated storybook for children who have been affected by the loss of a sibling. It’s an honest, sensitive and comforting story about two brothers trying to decide what to do, on what would have been their sister Lydie’s first birthday. A beautiful, engaging and sensitive book, to help make something so hard to talk to children about a little easier – and which would bring comfort to adults reading it too.” The Miscarriage Association

Images copyright Emma Poore
Author Bio

Emma Poore is a children’s author and illustrator with a diverse background in Theatre and Events. Honoring her daughter Lydie and her family’s bereavement journey through the eyes of her young sons, George and Henry, “Where are you Lydie?” is an illustrated picture book for young bereaved siblings affected by the death of a baby brother or sister. Endorsed by Sands – stillbirth and neonatal death charity and recommended by a growing number of bereavement charities and healthcare professionals, Emma’s book continues to be well received by many bereaved families worldwide.

Emma has written and talked about her family’s experience of child grief and sibling loss for The Telegraph, The Independent and various other publications and podcasts. To read her blog, more reviews, and find out more visit www.emmapoore.co.uk.  Be sure to follow her on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook.

Images copyright Emma Poore

We will be giving away a copy of “Where are you Lydie?” to one lucky winner.

Choose one or more ways to enter:

  1. Sign up for email notifications at ChildLifeMommy.com and leave a comment below.
  2. Facebook: Follow Child Life Mommy and tag a friend.
  3. Facebook: Follow @EmmaPooreAuthor
  4. Instagram: Follow @ChildLifeMommy and @EmmaPooreAuthor and tag two friends in the post.
  5. Twitter: Follow, Like, and RT the post to @ChildLifeMommy and @EmmaPoore4

Good luck, the winner will be chosen by 1/30/21.

Related Articles

Helping Children Cope with Grief and Loss: A Guide for Caregivers 

“I wish that mommy never dies.” How we helped our preschooler cope with grief

Tips to Support a Child Receiving Stitches

The first set of stitches is in the books for my little guy, Blake.  After I tossed him in a pond our giant lab, Tank leaped right on top of him. His paw hit Blake’s face and punctured his lip. Both of my kids freaked out. I mean full on tears and a hard time breathing. Blake went limp like a ragdoll, puked before we got him in the car, and then fell asleep from exhaustion. He was at a level 10 for anxiety. We had a 2-hour drive to urgent care, so it gave us time to regroup and calm down.

Here is what we did to make the situation go from high anxiety with pain and trauma to a successful procedure.
  1. I stayed calm. I lowered my voice, made good eye contact, and reminded him that this was my job.
  2. I prepared him for what he would experience. I gave him lots of details and cleared up misconceptions.
    I talked about his job of keeping his body still and breathing. I explained that stitches are string bandaids and that the doctor will numb the area so that he wouldn’t feel it.
  3. I validated his emotions and provided reassurance. “You are so scared right now. I will be there to help you.”
  4. Advocacy. This was a big one for me. I advocated for topical numbing cream which the doctor was hesitant on but then agreed. I knew it would decrease the pain from the lidocaine injection.
  5. Comfort hold. There was a papoose board in the trauma room and B asked what it was. Every meme that The iPad Lady has posted went through my head. There was no way they were going to use that. He was able to lay directly on my chest in a position for comfort.
  6. Distraction. I held up my phone so B could watch a movie during the procedure.
  7. Choices. I gave him as many choices as I could.
  8.  ONE VOICE. When he was getting the stitches it was just the doctor and us, no other team members. Everyone was super calm, the doctor would talk to him about what he was doing before he did it.
  9.  Procedural Support. I named things that he was doing great on, slow deep breaths & keeping his body still.
  10.  Bravery Reward. Yes, he got ice cream and chose a small toy for being so brave.

Highlights: The doctor said,” Good idea Mom on the numbing cream.” ❤️

You can continue to help kids process their experiences and feel empowerment when you ask them to share their stories. It could be done through medical play, art, journaling, or verbaling telling you.

 

Related Articles:

Medical Play 

5 Tips to Help Your Child at The Doctor 

How to Pack an Emergency Go Bag

Helping Children Cope During a School Lockdown: Spotlight and Giveaway

Our children are growing up in a society where school shootings occur more frequently than ever before. It’s terrifying just to hear about it, let alone experience. It fuels anxiety, leaving parents, educators and students navigating ways to cope. One solution is to be prepared, creating lockdown drills to teach children what to do in this type of traumatic event. Sometimes these drills can create fear and misconceptions for children. Having a children’s book that explains a lockdown drill to children, can be beneficial.

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