“The Donut That Roared: A Child’s Guide To Surviving an MRI” Spotlight and Giveaway

I am thrilled to feature the co-author, Joan Yordy Brasher and her recently published children’s book, The Donut That Roared. This is a must-have book for any child life program, radiology department or parent of a child with a chronic illness.

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Raising the Awareness of Cerebral Palsy

Raising Awareness of Cerebral Palsy

Cerebralpalsyguidance.com is a comprehensive source for information on the complex condition of cerebral palsy.

One of the major goals of National Health Education Week is to raise national awareness of major diseases and promote a better understanding of the role of public education in dealing with them, and this is certainly true in the case of Cerebral Palsy and the impact that it has on patients, their families, and the community as a whole. Cerebral Palsy refers to a group of disorders that damage the brain during the initial developing stages after birth or while still in utero. The resulting damage can affect the body’s ability to move, muscle tone, control, or coordination, reflexes, posture, and balance. There may also be intellectual impairments, vision and hearing problems, and epilepsy. Cerebral Palsy is a permanent condition.

When it comes to what causes Cerebral Palsy to develop in the first place medical science is still a bit in the dark. There is no single cause for the disease and in many cases, it is unknown why a baby is born with it. There is some evidence that certain complications with the birthing process such as asphyxia or lack of oxygen can play a role, but on the whole, it is still a mystery. What researchers are confident of is that there are a bunch of issues that can take place during the development of a fetus that can increase the odds of Cerebral Palsy developing. Chief among these indicators are premature birth, low birth weight, and blood clotting problems. Other possible causes for Cerebral Palsy can include an infection or environmental exposure (e.g. lead poisoning) while in the womb and genetic problems.

When diagnosing Cerebral Palsy there are certain markers that physicians look for as indicators. These markers are not generally the result of any single examination, but instead are part of a lengthy screening process that is usually conducted between the ages of 2 to 5. That said, sometimes the symptoms are severe enough that doctors can make a diagnosis shortly after birth. The screening process is normal for all babies and is designed to see if they are suffering a multitude of possibly life inhibiting conditions such as hypothyroidism, galactosemia, and sickle cell diseases. There are also a set of tests to check metabolism, hearing, and vision, as well as the APGAR (activity, pulse, grimace, appearance, and respiration) score which can all contribute to a diagnosis.

There are no known cures for Cerebral Palsy, however, there is a range of treatments available to help children reach their greatest potential as they develop and mature into adulthood. This often takes the form of assistance in learning how to control motor functions, speech, learning, and dealing with their environment. Medications are also prescribed to help mitigate muscle pain and stiffness, and in some cases, surgery is used to correct scoliosis which is a common trait among sufferers of Cerebral Palsy.

Cerebral Palsy affects approximately 1 million people in the United States and can be devastating if not properly diagnosed at a young age. Treatments are available to help, but perhaps the biggest help comes from raising awareness of this condition and to encourage research that will hopefully one day finding a cure.

 

Mesothelioma in Children: Childhood Cancer Awareness Month

Mesothelioma in Children: Childhood Cancer Awareness Month

Mesothelioma.net is a comprehensive source for information on mesothelioma.

September is Childhood Cancer Awareness Month and the facts are that just under 16,000 children and young adults are diagnosed with some type of cancer each year, and about a quarter of them do not recover. Mesothelioma is a very malignant, but rare cancer in adults, and it occurs even less often in children. This is generally because mesothelioma can take decades to fully develop and cause symptoms.

Causes of Mesothelioma in Young People

Asbestos exposure is almost always the root cause behind cases of mesothelioma. When adults are diagnosed with the disease, it’s usually because they had some exposure to it at an earlier point in their lives. Along with direct exposure, it’s also possible for families of asbestos-exposed workers to have secondhand exposure. This can occur when the worker comes home and has asbestos fibers on their clothes or in their hair. However, with children, it seems unlikely that asbestos exposure is the direct cause of mesothelioma. A study of 80 childhood mesothelioma cases revealed that only two children had previous asbestos exposure. Inhaled asbestos fibers typically do not cause any damage until many years down the road. Instead, researchers have found preliminary evidence that radiation exposure could be a risk factor in childhood mesothelioma cases. Other theories include the BAP1 gene and isoniazid exposure at the fetal stage.

Symptoms of Children with Mesothelioma

Some of the same symptoms that adults get with mesothelioma are also present in children. Appetite loss, weight loss, chest pain, difficulty breathing and fever are all typical symptoms. Unfortunately, these symptoms can easily represent another condition, which is one of the reasons why mesothelioma is often not diagnosed until it’s reached a critical stage. Such a diagnosis is less likely with children as it’s an even rarer disease in that age group.

Treatment of Children with Mesothelioma

Similar treatments are used for children with mesothelioma as for adults. Radiation and chemotherapy are the most common. Surgery can be more difficult on younger children especially. In cases of metastasized cancer, surgery is even less likely to be an option. Treatment is also just as difficult for children as for adults. In a review of seven childhood cases, only two of the children made it past five years after the initial diagnosis. The other cases saw no improvement after radiation and surgery. Chemotherapy allowed a few cases to stay in remission for over five years.

Mesothelioma is an appalling disease and it’s tragic for anyone to be diagnosed with it, much less a child. Research on the rare diagnosis continues to improve in hopes that future cases will be much better understood.