Helping Kids Cope with Big Feelings: Spotlight on Spirituality for Kids International

Guest Blogger, Genevieve Lowry 

As children return to school in the fall they may be experiencing more than just the first day of school jitters. Social isolation, institutional strain, and economic hardship have contributed to increased mental health challenges among children and adolescents.  After a year of changing school environments and routines, isolation, loss, and uncertainty children will require time and space to recover and relearn to trust not only in the systems and adults who care for them but also in themselves. Children will need opportunities that build confidence and self-esteem lost to a year of unprecedented challenges that have left them unsure of their own light that shines from within. 

Spirituality for Kids International Inc. (SFK) is an educational non-profit that builds social-emotional learning (SEL). SEL content and programs equip children with the tools to adapt, grow and learn the life skills needed to face adversity and challenges. After a year like no other children need opportunities to explore interests, identify strengths, and tap into the support that will help them to feel safe again. Through evidenced and asset-based curriculum, videos, and hands-on activities, SFK teaches children viable ways to tap into their inner strengths and see their true potential. Using a unique and immersive learning experience, SFK strives to support children and those who care for them in home, school, and community settings by strengthening relationships, developing self-awareness, and teaching tools for responsible decision making. 

Over the past two years, I have had the opportunity to work with the team at SFK reviewing materials and videos that help children trust in themselves, learn to recognize their own gifts, and identify helpers who encourage children to become all they can be. I have found them to be innovative thinkers and always open to fresh ideas. Their new short-form video series is no exception. SFK wants to know what parents, caregivers, and professionals think about their videos and accompanying materials. They are requesting you watch the following videos and answer a short survey in hopes to acquire data that will help the organization to know if they are hitting their mark

A shooting Star

This is an inspiring small story about big feelings and a loss of a loved one. And how to find the power within to overcome, stay true to yourself, and find inspiration.

The concepts in this lesson covered in the video and activities are:

  • Loss of a loved one
  • Managing big feelings
  • The Light is always present
  • What others say or do is not in our control
  • Being my true self

Click Here for the Shooting Star Activities: PDF

Take the Survey and let us know what you think.

Learn more at SFK.org and follow on Facebook, Instagram, and YouTube.