Support for Families Going Through Divorce During a Pandemic

Guest Blogger, Brooke Chaplan

The current COVID-19 pandemic has affected many aspects of daily living around the world. In the U.S., families are dealing with conflict and tensions as they struggle to adjust to the new normal impacting jobs, healthcare, and education. For many couples, deep-rooted issues are surfacing, causing them to reevaluate their relationship. Some are choosing to divorce, and their families need professional support during this difficult time. Here are some options that could help.

Legal Assistance

Couples who are ready to end their marriage will need to deal with several issues, including their home, children, income, bills, and possessions among other things. Many spouses need the objective guidance of a family law attorney to help them sort out their differences and find a reasonable resolution. A legal separation lawyer can provide objective guidelines for dividing the household and dissolving marital bonds while respecting the needs of both spouses.

Family Counseling

Couples and their children, if any, may benefit from participating in family counseling either individually or as a group. This can help each member come to terms with the divorce and the beginning of a new life that will change relationships and possibly locations. A family counselor can work with each person and the family as a whole to heal emotional wounds and support new life goals and directions. Concerns about family pets, school, community activities, and other questions can be addressed with the assistance of a licensed counselor.

Personal Therapy

If one or more members of the family are dealing with issues like substance abuse, financial insolvency, or problem behavior, individual therapy may be helpful in supporting that person in coming to terms with aspects of his or her actions or interactions that will facilitate recovery and improvement. While the divorce will likely proceed, family members’ problems can be addressed for a healthier and successful future.

Spiritual Support

Membership in a church, synagogue, mosque, or another congregation of religious worship can be very comforting during times of extreme change and potential loss. Family members who do not attend worship services may want to visit a local congregation to explore spiritual beliefs that can help to support them in going through a relationship breakup and family reorganization. Some people prefer yoga or meditation, while others find peace and solace in nature.

These professional organizations can become pillars of support during a family breakup. While divorce is never easy, it may become more bearable with the help of entities like the above.

Author Bio

Brooke Chaplan is a freelance writer and blogger. She lives and works out of her home in Los Lunas, New Mexico. She loves the outdoors and spends most of her time hiking, biking, and gardening. For more information, contact Brooke via Facebook at facebook.com/brooke.chaplan or Twitter @BrookeChaplan

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When Your Parents Divorce: A Kid-to-Kid Guide to Dealing with Divorce

Divorce is the Worst 

How to Help a Child Cope with Divorce

Guest Blogger, Brooke Chaplan

Divorce is a situation that occurs in many households, and if you and your spouse have decided to separate, you should know that you are not alone. Resources certainly exist to help you cope with this new experience, and some of those resources can also help your children. Here are just some of the ways you can help a child cope with his or her parents’ divorce.

Have a Plan

When you first tell your children about the divorce, you likely do not have a detailed plan for exactly how the situation is going to play out. Still though, you can have at least the start of a plan. For example, maybe you have already decided that the children will spend the school weeks with one parent and weekends with the other, or perhaps you can set a schedule for holidays due to religious beliefs that are different from your partner’s. Some of the concerns that arise with divorce have to do with the unknown, and offering children some stable answers can help.

Seek Professional Guidance

You might think that you and your spouse will work through all of the details independently and that you don’t need to seek professional help. However, since you are navigating a new situation, you likely do not realize all of the obstacles that could come in the way. Instead of trying to manage these challenges independently, work with a divorce attorney. This person can help you to make decisions that benefit both your family members and yourself. Without professional guidance, more stress can manifest for you, your partner and your children.

Maintain Routines

If you’ve ever been on a long vacation from work, you may have found that you were craving to get back into a routine at the end of that break. Children can thrive on routines as well. Too many big changes at once can cause additional irritation and stress for your kids. Work to keep them in their regular activities, to bring them to social events with their friends and to prepare meals on a schedule. As you do this, make sure that your children know that they can come to you with any questions they have. Let them take a break if they need to in order to cope, but have the routine in place for when they come back to it.

Do Something Special

In the midst of the divorce, new living arrangements and overall adjustments for everyone, planning any other sort of activity might seem ludicrous. However, think about several months from now when you will likely have at least found a new normal for yourself. Put a special date in the calendar that your kids can look forward to. Depending upon time, budgetary concerns and other factors, you can make this outing as large or as small as necessary and desired.

Children are certainly affected by divorce to varying degrees. Committing to and implementing some strategies can help to make the situation as positive as possible for your kids.

Author Bio

Brooke Chaplan is a freelance writer and blogger. She lives and works out of her home in Los Lunas, New Mexico. She loves the outdoors and spends most of her time hiking, biking, and gardening. For more information, contact Brooke via Facebook at facebook.com/brooke.chaplan or Twitter @BrookeChaplan

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When Your Parents Divorce: A Kid-to-Kid Guide to Dealing with Divorce

Divorce is the Worst 

 

 

When Your Parents Divorce A kid-to-kid guide to dealing with divorce

Guest Blogger, Kimberly King 

Divorce can be a traumatic experience for children, but parents can do a lot to help ease stress and uncertainty. When Your Parents Divorce is a useful tool that parents can use to help children with questions and concerns that arise during this challenging and stressful time. Told from a child’s perspective, using clear and kid-friendly language, When Your Parents Divorce will help you and your children adjust to divorce in a positive, cooperative, and supportive way. The book aims to ease discord and confusion in the family and prevent Parent Alienation. A must-read for parents and kids.

  • One of a kind, a unique book created for kids and shared in a kids voice. Told from a child’s perspective, based on a real-life kid story Full of real-life kid scenarios that your child encounter as they adjust to your divorce
  • Presented in kid language that provides comfort on a tough topic.
  • Bibliotherapy, helping kids talk about their feelings by using books, is an effective therapeutic way to help kids cope with difficult emotions

Using a simple, direct, comforting approach that doesn’t dumb down the issues involved, as well as an easy-to-use system to help kids engage in open conversations with parents. When Your Parents Divorce covers a variety of topics, including:

Clarification of the terms and definitions involved in separation and divorce.

  • Supportive talking points for parents and children
  • Helping kids realize each parent’s value and worth.
  • Teaches kids that they are not alone.
  • Kids learn to be aware and express their feelings.
  • Explains that divorce is never their fault.
  • The story encourages family collaboration and cooperation.
  • Identifies some everyday worries, problems, and issues kids may experience as they adjust to the new family situation.
  • Stresses the way families can get along in a positive way when they work together
About the Author: 

Kimberly King left her traditional job as a kindergarten teacher to write books for children on difficult and often emotional topics. Kimberly King is a child-development professional, certified early-childhood educator, and darkness2light.org sexual abuse prevention Stewards of Children facilitator. She holds a Bachelor of Science degree in early childhood development and family studies from the University of Maine and a Master of Science degree in early childhood education. She is the author of, I Said No!, the best-selling children’s book about sexual-abuse prevention. King is the author of three kid-to-kid guides:

King lives with her family in Connecticut and is available for media trainings, interviews, school visits, and author signings.