Words Worth Repeating: Spotlight and Giveaway

Parents, child life specialists, and teachers are always looking for a book to help kids cope with a challenging situations. Maybe it’s a new medical diagnosis, understanding the loss of a loved one, or relocating after a natural disaster. Books can provide a safe space for children, through validation and learning new coping skills.

I’m thrilled to introduce our guest blogger, Laura Camerona. She is a child life specialist, parent, and founder of Words Worth Repeating

Guest Blogger, Laura Camerona, Founder of Words Worth Repeating

Words Worth Repeating (WWR) is a child life specialist-owned business that creates books for families and organizations. WWR was founded on the idea that kids benefit from getting the information they can understand from the people who love and care for them. WWR creates customized books for specific children and families.  WWR also partners with organizations to create more global books that can support children going through similar situations such as: having a sibling in the NICU, losing a loved one to suicide, or losing a baby to stillbirth. The books are written by a Child Life Specialist and use many phrases or descriptions that have proven helpful in real-life situations.

It’s not just a product, it’s a service.

The goal is to provide a comfortable process where WWR and a family collaborate to create a product that gives children the words they need to express their feelings and understand their situation. These books can be used as a way to educate their peers and classmates, support kids, who are grieving and give parents words to have hard conversations. Many families find that the process of creating these books with Words Worth Repeating is therapeutic.  Words Worth Repeating gathers information from families through email or video chat. Families receive support and advice regarding what words and support might be helpful for their children. The words for the books are written by a child life specialist, but families always have the last say and the ability to change every aspect.  Photos from the family are used as illustrations from the book but are supplemented with watercolor illustrations and color to pull kids in.

Journey Books

A customized children’s book about any condition a child or their loved one is experiencing. It is impossible to find a book about a condition that has all the details just right. WWR offers the ability to create a book about an individual’s journey. A child life specialist, who has experience with children in stressful healthcare situations, will work with you to create a book specifically about your child or your child’s loved one and their diagnosis, illness, or disability. Some examples of subjects that WWR has created Journey Books about are: diabetes, cancer, hand anomaly, rare syndrome, loved one’s dementia, and a loved one’s intellectual disability

Legacy Books

A customized children’s book about a loved one who has died (could be a recent death of someone the child never met). Help keep the legacy of their loved one alive, by having a storybook about them created. Books are written in words that children can understand and focus on the connection between the child and the deceased person. General concepts about death, death rituals, and/or your family’s beliefs can be included. WWR will collaborate with you to create the right book for your child and your situation. These books can be appropriate for a recent death or a relative they never met. Your child can tell you about the characters in their books and TV shows, but do they remember everything about their loved one who has died?

Universal Books

WWR has self-published a few books based on needs experienced while working in a children’s hospital.  These books were created in a way that represents no specific race, culture, religion, or family demographics. The books are written in a way that helps caregivers start conversations, explain complex topics, and support feelings.  These hard words are put right into the caregiver’s mouths

In addition, WWR now partners with organizations to create additional books that focus on each organization’s mission to educate and support unique groups and families.  Most recently, WWR is publishing a book created in partnership with the Iowa SIDS Foundation to support siblings after a SIDS death and a book in partnership with Mindspring Mental Health Alliance to support feelings and educate after a child’s loved one dies of suicide. Click here to learn more.

How to connect

Words Worth Repeating is excited to collaborate and create something unique and special. For more information, check out our website: www.wordsworthrepeating.com and follow Words Worth Repeating on Facebook: @WordsWorthRepeatingBooks or on Instagram: @words.worth.repeating  Several of WWR’s Universal Books are also available on Amazon and other online outlets.

Our winner of the giveaway will get to choose between a  Universal Book or a 15% discount to a Customized Book Creation.

Choose one or more ways to enter:

1. Sign up for email notifications at ChildLifeMommy.com and leave a comment below.

2. Facebook: Follow Child Life Mommy and tag two friends.

3. Facebook: Follow Words Worth Repeating and leave a comment about the giveaway.

4. Instagram: Follow @ChildLifeMommy and  @Words.Worth.Repeating and tag two friends in the post.

Good Luck, the winner will be chosen on 6/24/22.

Academics In Childhood: 4 Reasons Why Early Education Is Essential

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Guest Blogger, Kara Masterson

Rhian Evans Allvin, executive director of the National Association for the Education of Young Children, explains; “There’s an explosion of activity in the first five years of life, more profound than any future years. If we can capitalize on that and maximize the support and learning opportunities, then we really stand a good chance of setting young children on a trajectory of success.” That is just part of the reason why early education is so important. Here are a few other reasons why this kind of education is essential.

Improved Social Skills

Learning how to interact with others is a skill that will benefit children throughout their lifetime. Within an early education setting, students socialize with other students. They learn to communicate, play, and take turns. Young children are also able to adjust better when they start Kindergarten because they have already been around other children in a structured environment. Oral language provides a foundation for literacy development and children have the chance to practice oral language when they are around others.

Enhanced Attention Spans

Children who receive early education will also have many opportunities to practice increasing their attention span. Daily schedules, story time, and classroom activities allow students to enhance their attention span by escalating their interest and level of engagement. Students have opportunities for structured and unstructured play where they are learning to attend to one thing at a time. Focusing on specific tasks is good preparation for the school years.

Develop Cognitive Skills

Children receiving an early education will learn the basics in all academic areas including reading, math, and science. Schools such as Miniapple International Montessori School provide opportunities for children to learn at their own pace through a discovery learning model. The effects of developing cognitive skills early on have shown to benefit children later on in school. In fact, children in early-learning programs show higher levels of achievement throughout school. Alternatively, if a child does have learning issues; they can be identified early.

Early Literacy Skills

Early literacy skills prepare children for so much more than just Kindergarten. Learning letters by sight and sound, phonological awareness, print awareness and vocabulary is quite literally the foundation that students build upon for the rest of their lives as readers. It is widely known that literacy skills are developed early in life and correlate greatly with school achievement. Furthermore, children who have limited experiences with language and literacy will have more difficulty learning to read.

Young children are sponges that soak up all that is happening in the world around them. Early education gives children the opportunity to practice social skills, enhance attention spans, develop cognitive skills, and teach early literacy skills. All children can benefit from early learning opportunities.