Support Hospitalized Military Children on Giving Tuesday

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There are 1.7 million children of U.S. military personnel. Known as MilKids, their lives have more than the typical challenges of childhood; they often face parental deployment, multiple moves, changes in schools, as well as a lack of extended family nearby. When a child is hospitalized it adds additional stress and anxiety.

Standish Foundation has created a program to bring comfort and support to these families. In 2018, we donated toys, games and crafts to children’s hospitals at Tripler Army, Portsmouth Naval and Walter Reed Medical Centers. We’re asking for your support to continue this important program in 2019.

CLICK HERE to Make Your Contribution!

Giving Tuesday“Nadeiah had so much fun with her doll. She loved decorating it and making it her own. She was so excited and happy. She named her doll “Faith” and loved that it didn’t have hair–just like her!

 

 

Click here to learn more about the Standish Foundation for Children and follow on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

Tips from The National Children’s Cancer Society: Keeping Siblings Happy and Engaged During Tough Times

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This is a guest post written by The National Children’s Cancer Society (NCCS). The NCCS is a not-for-profit organization providing support to families making their way through the daunting world of childhood cancer and survivorship.

When a family is going through a tough time, such as when a child is sick, a large amount of attention is focused on that child. This family focus can leave their healthy siblings feeling angry, guilty, isolated, sad and anxious.

However, research from the Journal of Pediatric Oncology reveals that when children possess a positive personal outlook on life, they’re likely to remain optimistic and have an easier time coping. Parents can help build this positivity through hands-on activities that give their healthy children a chance to process feelings and connect with their families during an emotional time.

With more than 30 years of experience serving nearly 43,000 children facing childhood cancer, the NCCS would like to share age-specific tips and activities to help keep healthy siblings happy and engaged during trying times. While these tips and activities may be designed for families with children that have cancer, many can be applied to families facing other hardships such as a death in the family or parental illness.

Birth to 3 years old:

  • Technology can help you feel connected while apart, use Facetime or record stories and lullabies to soothe the baby while he/she is with a babysitter or in a new environment.
  • Since transitions can take some time, it’s best not to attempt toilet training or major developmental tasks until there is a consistent routine in place.
  • Suggested activity:
    • Play with playdough – Kneading dough is an opportunity to talk while playing, work out tensions and have fun with the baby. Scented playdough can enhance relaxation.

3-5 years old:

  • Even if toddlers revert to behaviors they have grown out of, including having accidents or throwing tantrums, continue implementing standards and discipline as before to provide a sense of security and routine.
  • Give concise explanations of what their sibling or family member is going through to allow them to feel informed and connected to what’s going on.
  • Suggested activity:
    • Pop cancer bubbles – Have children blow bubbles and pretend to be a chemo shark or radiation monster who pops bubbles to kill cancer cells. This will give them relief while developing a small understanding of treatments.

6-12 years old:

  • If possible, let children decide for themselves who will be helping care for them when parents are traveling or absent overnight.
  • Explain that all feelings experienced are okay and reassure them that even their tough feelings are alright too.
  • Suggested activity:
    • Make colorful paper chains – Help children write feeling words on strips of construction paper and discuss what they mean, such as love, life, hope and courage. Let kids decide what order they want their strips in and where they want to hang their finished product.

13-18 years old:

  • Arrange a tour of the hospital or clinic with their brother/sister and encourage them to ask questions of the medical team.
  • Give teens abundant permission to talk about themselves, as they’re probably receiving a lot of questions about their siblings.
  • Suggested activity:
    • Trade something special – When away or busy, trade something personal or special with each other. This will help teens feel supported and connected to their family members through hard times.

About The National Children’s Cancer Society (NCCS)

The National Children’s Cancer Society (NCCS), headquartered in St. Louis, Missouri, is a not-for-profit organization providing support to families making their way through the daunting world of childhood cancer and survivorship. With over 30 years of experience serving nearly 43,000 children, the NCCS is able to take a “no matter what” approach to help families stay strong, stay positive and stay together. The NCCS has been recognized as a Better Business Bureau Accredited Charity and earned a GuideStar Platinum Seal of Transparency. For more information call 314-241-1600, visit theNCCS.org, or on Facebook and Twitter.

 

Bubbles and Bandaids: Spotlight and Giveaway

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Child life specialists have been discussing dress code policies for years. Should we wear scrubs, business casual, or have uniforms? Our job requires us to move a lot, play and create with art and sometimes get an unexpected surprise of a child’s bodily fluids.

So what should we wear that is comfortable, washable and provides others with an idea of our role? Bubbles and Bandaids has solved that problem. I’m so excited to share the dynamic duo, Betsy and Carissa, who created this company and are now helping child life specialists enjoy apparel both in and out of work.

Guest Blogger, Carissa from Bubbles and Bandaids

How Bubbles and Bandaids started:

Betsy and I met 8-9 years ago at work. We were both working as child life specialists at a local children’s hospital in Southern, Ca. Betsy has been in child life for 10 years and I have been in the field for fifteen. Work and family took Betsy out of state, but we were able to reconnect at the 2018 ACLP conference. We had a discussion about the lack of child life apparel and decided something needed to be done. We came up with our name that same night and then began dreaming and planning.

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What’s in the shop?

We currently offer 5 shirt designs. They are all original by our designer, Jaye. We share our idea/vision and he brings it to life. Our goal is to offer quality shirts that can be worn both at work and play! Along with our shirts we also have a great badge reel and lanyard.

All of our designs are currently available. Pre-orders will run October 10-20th and then shirts will ship beginning of November. Our first batch of shirts sold out quick, so we are trying something new with pre-orders to ensure everyone gets the size they want/need. These make great gifts for the holidays and starting new internships, so be sure to click here and get your gear.

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Win a t-shirt design of your choice. Choose one or more ways to enter:

1. Sign up for email notifications at Child Life Mommy and leave a comment below.

2. Facebook: Follow Child Life Mommy, tag a friend and leave a comment on the post.

3. Facebook: Follow Bubbles and Bandaids and leave a comment about the giveaway.

4. Twitter: Follow, Like and RT the post to @ChildLifeMommy.

5. Instagram: Follow @ChildLifeMommy & @BubblesandBandaids, Like the post and tag a friend.

Good Luck! Winner will be chosen 10/19/18. Shipped to residents in U.S. and Canada.